Riot police abuses their power again by demolishing the altar of student Chow Police said they are just shifting but not removing it

On 28 Feb 2020, numerous riot police pull down the altar of student Chow on 2F Sheung Tak car park. Paper cranes and post-its were spread through the floor chaotically.
Live news indicated that one of the riot police shouted,’ We respect the dead the most.’ At the same time, other riot police kicked the paper cranes away.

At 29 Feb night, police responded related inquiries that their officers were investigating on 2F of the car park.  When they were looking into a batch of bricks and glass bottles, they ‘have removed some objects there for checking’ and they emphasized that they did not remove any other objects there.

Article 29 in Basic Law
The homes and other premises of Hong Kong residents shall be inviolable. Arbitrary or unlawful search of, or intrusion into, a resident’s home or other premises shall be prohibited.

Cap. 200 Crimes Ordinance in Laws of Hong Kong

Destroying or damaging property
(1)A person who without lawful excuse destroys or damages any property belonging to another intending to destroy or damage any such property or being reckless as to whether any such property would be destroyed or damaged shall be guilty of an offence.
(2)A person who without lawful excuse destroys or damages any property, whether belonging to himself or another—
(a)intending to destroy or damage any property or being reckless as to whether any property would be destroyed or damaged; and
(b)intending by the destruction or damage to endanger the life of another or being reckless as to whether the life of another would be thereby endangered,
shall be guilty of an offence.
POLICE GENERAL ORDERS CHAPTER 44  44-04 :
A police officer shall not enter any premises for the purpose of a search unless he is
legally empowered to do so, or has the consent of the owner or occupier of the premises.
2. A police officer, having entered any premises to conduct a search with the consent of the
owner/occupier, shall forthwith leave the premises once the consent to enter has been withdrawn
by the owner/occupier. Where such consent is given, the officer will record this fact in his
official notebook and read the entry to the person or invite him to read it himself, and thereafter
invite the person who gave the consent to sign his name next to the entry. If entry into the
premises has been granted by the owner or occupier for the purpose of making general enquiries,
and at the time of entry the officer does not intend to conduct a search and gather evidence, there
is no need for the owner/occupier to sign the officer’s notebook entry.
3. If an officer has entered premises to make enquiries with the owner/occupier and
subsequently decides to conduct a search of the premises, the provisions of paragraphs 1 and 2
above apply, and a search should only be conducted if the officer is legally empowered to do so or
has the consent of the owner/occupier of the premises.