2020.04.18 [Manhunt] of 15 pro-democracy activists, including Martin Lee, Margaret Ng and Jimmy Lai, in connection with last year’s anti-ELAB rally

While Hongkongers were busy fighting against the epidemic, the regime took advantage of the situation to launch a political purge. 15 pro-democracy activists were arrested and charged in connection with three anti-ELAB protests last year, including a “flowing” rally August 18 in Victoria Park which was attended by 1.7 million people. Leaders of major political parties and organizations within the pro-democracy camp are on the arrest list, and Martin Lee Chu-Ming, the “father of democracy” in Hong Kong, is also a first-time defendant, saying he is proud to be on the road to democracy with young protesters who have been suppressed. The raid has also attracted international attention as a further blow to “one country, two systems”.

 

Police: not ruling out more arrests of people involved in organizing and participating in unauthorized gatherings

The police gave an account of the case in the afternoon. Superintendent of Police of the Hong Kong Regional Crime Headquarters (Operations) Lam Wing-ho said that 12 men and two women, aged between 24 and 81, were arrested during the operation, and that the persons concerned had organized and participated in unauthorized gatherings on August 18, October 1 and October 20 last year on Hong Kong Island and in Kowloon, in violation of section 17 of the Public Order Ordinance.

Summing up the news from all sides, the list of 14 people arrested is as follows: Martin Lee Chu-Ming, Margaret Ng Ngoi-yee, Jimmy Lai Chee-ying, Albert Ho Chun-yan, Yeung Sum, Leung Kwok-hung, Lee Cheuk-yan, Sin Chung-kai, Cyd Ho Sau-lan, Au Nok-hin, Figo Chan, Raphael Wong Ho-ming, Richard Tsoi Yiu-cheong and Avery Ng Man-yuen.

 

Margaret Ng went to the police station on her own to be arrested

Margaret Ng went to the Central Police Station at 3 p.m. for her arrest. The source said police had gone to Margaret Ng’s home this morning to make an arrest, but Ng was not at home and was at a law firm in Central at noon. Civic Party friend Audrey Eu Yuet-mee met with Ng and left later.

The Hong Kong Island Regional Crime Unit took action this morning (18th) and went to the mansion of Next Media founder Jimmy Lai Chee-ying at Kadoorie Hill, Ho Man Tin, saying that an investigation would be launched. But Lai was not at his residence at that time. The police waited for him to return and later left. At about 1:30 p.m., Lai returned to the residence and was taken away by police about an hour later.

 

Martin Lee: feel relieved

Martin Lee left the Central Police Station on bail at around 4:45 p.m., saying, “Finally I become the defendant,” describing how he felt “relieved now because during all these years and months, I saw so many young people got arrested and prosecuted, but I was not the defendant, in fact I was not happy about it.”

The Security Bureau issued a statement saying that all people are equal before the law in Hong Kong and no one can be above the law or break the law without facing the consequences. If there is evidence that anyone has broken the law, regardless of his or her status or background, he or she will face the law and no one will enjoy any privileges. The police will definitely handle the matter fairly and impartially in accordance with the law.

When meeting with reporters, pro-democracy lawmaker Lam Cheuk-ting said that former Democratic Party chairman Yeung Sum was alleged to have organized and participated in unauthorized rallies on Oct 1 and Oct 18 last year. Civic Party member and lawmaker Alvin Yeung, criticized the Government for using filthy and dirty tactics to take revenge while the Legislative Council was dealing with the anti-epidemic fund and the community was busy fighting the epidemic.

 

Sources:

The Stand News – Police arrested 15 pro-democracy activists, including Martin Lee, Margaret Ng and Jimmy Lai, in connection with last year’s anti-ELAB rally

Apple Daily – A major manhunt for 15 pro-democracy activists including Marin Lee and Margaret Ng